GABI and the ENGKANTO (The Story of the First Gabi Plant and Why Its Leaves Never Get Wet)

GABI and the ENGKANTO (The Story of the First Gabi Plant and Why Its Leaves Never Get Wet)

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Author: Marla Yotoko Chorengel
Illustrator: Ibarra Crisostomo

Out-of-Print Title

Gabi leaves do not get wet because of a wax-like coating. The gabi or taro, is a native of the Philippines and its Pacific island neighbors. Its large, long-stalked leaves shaped like arrows or hearts, spring from an underground corm with roots. The leaves and corms are rich in minerals and vitamins A and C. They must be cooked thorougly to take away any itchiness they may cause to the throat. The itchiness is caused by crystals which protect the gabi plant from being eaten by rodents or other animals. It has a sap that gives a permanent black stain to clothing. In 1591, early Spanish manuscripts recorded the existence of the "Iwak", a gabi-growing/eating mountain tribe in the Cordillera mountain ranges of Luzon, Philippines. Gabi was the tuber around which their agricultural cycle revolved. Today, gabi leaves cooked with coconut milk make delicious native dishes called "Laing" and Pinangat. Gabi tubers or corms add a special flavor and texture to Sinigang, a popular Filipino dish.

  • ISBN-10 : 9715690017
  • ISBN-13 : 978-9715690010
  • Publisher : Bookmark (January 1, 1990)

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